Submit an ePoster

    Abstract submissions are now closed for our 2022 International Dementia Conference – Brave New World. Thank you to those who took the time to submit. We are currently reviewing submissions and will notify successful parties via email in the week of 9 May 2022.  

    We continue to welcome ePoster submissions until 23:59 (PST), 18 August 2022. 

    About the conference

    International Dementia Conference: Brave New World brings together thought leaders and cutting-edge practitioners to explore how we shape health and aged care through innovative models of care. 

    We encourage abstracts from health and aged care professionals, researchers and community carers working in practice and innovation in the delivery of care services, with a focus on complex dementia, palliative care and positive ageing, as well as scientific, clinical and psychosocial research. 

    We especially welcome contributions from people living with dementia and carers who have unique perspectives and stories to share. Our conference team is happy to offer support in both the preparation and presentation aspects of your submission. 

    Join the conversation at IDC and explore how we shape the future of the way we live, love and care together.

    Submission Guidelines

    The deadline to submit ePosters is 23:59 (PST), 18 August 2022.

    ePosters
    This is an opportunity to present your work in a presentation format. International Dementia Conference works with an external provider to ensure your poster is displayed to the best advantage to reach a large number of delegates. All selected submissions will be requested in electronic pdf, or an interactive PowerPoint slide. Further information will be provided to those selected.

    Papers selected as ePosters do not need to attend the conference in person. 

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    If you are a person living with dementia or a carer who would like to submit an ePoster, we are here to help.

    If you would like some assistance in submitting your ePoster, please get in touch at conference@hammond.com.au 

     

    Key dates

    • Deadline for submission of ePosters - 23:59 (PST), 18 August 2022, late submissions may be considered.
    • International Dementia Conference – 8-9 September 2022.

    Submit ePoster    Guide to submitting an ePoster 


    Themes

    International Dementia Conference: Brave New World is an opportunity to look forward with hope to see positive change, fresh approaches and new ways of thinking in complex dementia, palliative care and positive ageing. 

    These themes are a guide only and you are welcome to submit any topic that you feel may be relevant. If it doesn’t fit in any of these sections, put it in our Be Brave option! 

     

    Innovation in Home Care

    Topics may include

    • Do Day Care services still have a role in dementia care?
    • What innovation is already happening, and what needs to happen in the future?
    • What does good respite look like, and is there evidence it makes a difference to people with dementia or carers?

    Innovation in Residential Care

    Innovation in Acute Care

    Topics may include

    • Decreasing hospital stays for people with dementia
    • Dementia and falls prevention
    • Dementia and continence
    • Dementia and complex care needs
    • Research, pilot projects and best practice care experiences
    • Papers that have investigated changes that improve individual outcomes at a lower cost of care are particularly welcome

     

    End of life & Palliative Care


    Topics may include

    • End of life decision making and advance care planning
    • Supportive community and residential end of life care
    • Treatment and interventions during end of life
    • Palliative care projects and learning from practice
    • Supporting families and care staff

    Governance & Regulation (we welcome papers in response to the royal commission, quality, safety and risk)

    Topics may include

    • Working sensibly with risk
    • Risk reduction programmes versus risk ‘embracing’ programmes
    • Understanding, prioritising and responding to risk
    • What is acceptable risk for people with dementia to have in care homes and how do we support this

    Diversity in Practice

    Topics may include

    • Expressing sexuality in older age: supporting staff to adopt professional approaches, confronting taboos and navigating wellness
    • New relationships – how do we address the needs of a person with dementia when they no longer identify with their spouse?
    • When does a change in the person with dementia’s expression of sexuality become a behaviour that challenges, and what tools and approaches are needed?
    • What is the latest in research or practice from different LGBTI groups or individuals

    Technology

    Topics may include

    • Research into technology platforms and their use
    • Ethical dilemmas and issues in practice
    • What rights to privacy do staff have if they are on camera all the time?
    • What new technologies are driving innovation in residential and community care?
    • Demonstrations or displays will be considered

    Design & the environment

    Topics may include

    • Interactive, physical models and use of VR platforms
    • Research on design that demonstrates quality improvement
    • Successful project management and decision making: how do we get it right?
    • Refurbishment projects: what we need to think about and learn from experience
    • Catching up with the innovators and pace setters in dementia design
    • What do we mean when we talk about ‘community’, ‘village’, ‘care home’
    • Designs that meet the needs of people with complex care or at end of life

    Food Culture

    Topics may include

    • Do olfactory and other sensory changes mean we need to think about food and mealtimes in a different way?
    • Are their miracle foods that help with cognition that we need to know about?
    • What is the research about best practice?
    • Is it all about a person’s weight or is it about wellbeing?
    • What does it mean to support someone to eat what they want, even if it’s against guidance? How do we support choice at the interface of regulation and guidance?

    Lived Experience. We welcome papers from people living with dementia and their carers

    • Papers from people living with dementia are an important part of the conference. We invite you to share your experience, views, writings and projects – there are no limits to the topics for discussion. We encourage submissions that represent your different and
      individual experiences, cultures, ages and backgrounds.
    • We are also seeking specific presentations on the needs of people at the later stage of dementia. How can we ensure these needs are heard and understood when verbal communication may no longer be the primary way of expressing who the person is and what they need?
    • People with dementia can be supported to prepare a submission and can present individually or with their care partner. If you would like assistance to plan or prepare your submission please email conference@hammond.com.au
    • Submissions from people with dementia that are accepted to present at the conference will be supported by a speaker’s fee and consideration of assistance with travel and accommodation

    The impact of behaviours

    Topics may include

    • Share personal views, clinical and practical experience and research
    • Experience from programs that work with people who need advice and support to understand behaviours when they occur
    • Specialist dementia services and units
    • The role of frameworks and tools to assist us

    The impact of pain

    Topics may include

    • Latest research

    Learning & Workforce

    Topics may include

    • Innovative training programmes
    • What’s new in eLearning
    • Consumer education
    • Ensuring knowledge translation
    • Capacity building models

    Re-engagement and Re-ablement

     

    Spiritual & Pastoral Care

    Topics may include

    • What is the evidence on what enables a positive pastoral care approach
    • What tools and approached support enabling spiritual care needs to be recognised and supported by care staff
    • What do we need to be ‘dementia friendly’ places of worship in the community and in care settings?

    Caring for First Nations people living with dementia

    Topics may include

    • Research and projects with First Nation communities
    • Direct experience of practice and support programs
    • Speakers addressing gaps and proposing changes and innovations into the future

    Be Brave - what are you doing?

    Have something which doesn’t quite fit into above – we would still love to hear it! Please include under this header

    Cluster Speakers

    Ineka Whiteman

    Dr Ineka Whiteman

    Australia

    Childhood dementia: the confronting reality of rare paediatric neurological disease

    Julie Reeves

    Julie Reeves

    Australia

    Community at the core

    Vicki Barry

    Vicki Barry

    Australia

    Better Living, Caring Together; creating dementia-friendly pocket neighbourhoods

    Angelina Penaluna

    Angelina Penaluna

    Australia

    Refurbish and Enrich

    Rob Deeming

    Rob Deeming

    Australia

    Smart home technology offers a flexible solution for supporting people with dementia and their family.

    Lisa Duconget

    Lisa Duconget

    France

    The journey of informal caregivers

    Karen Lake

    Karen Lake

    New Zealand

    myRyman Life Model of Dementia Care

    Jeanette Tamplin

    Dr Jeanette Tamplin

    Australia

    ReminiSing – exploring participant perspective sand reflecting on the creation of community-based choirs for people living with dementia and their family supporters.

    Brugh O Brien

    Brugh O'Brien

    Australia

    The Value of Engaging Lived Experience in the Design of the Neurobehavioural Unit at the Repat Health Precinct in Adelaide

    Sarah Jordans

    Sarah Jordans

    Australia

    The Value of Engaging Lived Experience in the Design of the Neurobehavioural Unit at the Repat Health Precinct in Adelaide

    Jenie Aikman

    Jenie Aikman

    Australia

    The Value of Engaging Lived Experience in the Design of the Neurobehavioural Unit at the Repat Health Precinct in Adelaide

    Hana Speering

    Hana Speering

    Australia

    Dehumanising Language in Dementia Care Settings

    Lara Speering

    Lara Speering

    Australia

    Dehumanising Language in Dementia Care Settings

    Hugh Archer

    Hugh Archer

    Australia

    Dehumanising Language in Dementia Care Settings

    B Sally Rimkeit

    Dr B Sally Rimkeit

    New Zealand

    A successful Kickstarter Campaign in New Zealand: Dovetale Press Books: Promote Dementia-friendly Libraries. 

    Lorraine Burgess

    Lorraine Burgess

    England, UK

    Cancer and Dementia - To Treat or Not to Treat, That is the Question

    Lynne Stone

    Lynne Stone

    Australia

    From clinic to community: An innovative model of collaborative care for those with language-led dementia

    Cathleen Taylor Rubin

    Cathleen Taylor-Rubin

    Australia

    From clinic to community: An innovative model of collaborative care for those with language-led dementia

    Garrie O Toole

    Garrie O'Toole

    Australia

    Promoting Dementia Friendly Hospitals

    Elaine Newman

    Elaine Newman

    Australia

    “Free” Workforce Training In Dementia: Exploring Questions Of Cost, Investment, Value, and Impact.

    Jason Burton

    Jason Burton

    Australia

    Rethinking Respite Using an Enabling Household Model

    Amee Baird

    Dr Amee Baird

    Australia

    Love and Dementia

    Jill Johnson Young

    Jill Johnson-Young

    United States

    We need to talk about grief and loss when dementia enters your relationship: Managing the losses caused by dementia in an intimate partnership

    Phillip Goulding

    Phillip Goulding

    Australia

    Aged and Homeless - you get what you deserve!

    Allison Rowlands

    Dr Allison Rowlands

    Australia

    Best practice residential care for older people with complex health care needs experiencing homelessness: stories from the field

    Simon Thorne

    Simon Thorne

    Australia

    Finding your way: in the city

    Claire O Connor

    Dr Claire O'Connor

    Australia

    Transition to residential care for older people with complex needs who are homeless

    Joanne Roseman

    Joanne Roseman

    Australia

    Decisions, Dying, and Death with Dementia

    Wendy Hall

    Wendy Hall

    Australia

    Dementia Doulas - creating a more consistent and community approach to end-of-life care. Why? Because no one should be going it alone.

    Melissa Reader

    Melissa Reader

    Australia

    LifeCircle - A solution to improve the end-of-life experience

    Jeff Hughes

    Professor Jeff Hughes

    Australia

    Pain in dementia: Prevalence, severity and detection

    Atee Mustafa

    Mustafa Atee

    Australia

    PainChek™ in Practice

    Samantha Bews

    Samantha Bews

    Australia

    The Language My Mother Speaks

    Deanne Morris

    Deanne Morris

    Australia

    ‘But I will need to wear my lipstick.’

    Lyntara Quirke

    Lyntara Quirke

    Australia

    Through my Husband's Eyes

    Glenys Petrie

    Glenys Petrie

    Australia

    There, but quietly in the shadows.

    Natalie Yates Bolton

    Dr. Natalie Yates-Bolton

    England, UK

    Empowered Conversations: the transformative power of effective communication with people living with dementia

    Lise Barry

    Dr Lise Barry

    Australia

    What Can We Learn from Spotify about the Decision-Making Rights of People with Dementia?

    julie christie

    Dr Julie Christie

    England

    Dependent Independence: A new paradigm in the care and support of people living with dementia.

    Francesca Greenwood

    Francesca Greenwood

    Scotland, UK

    "I SEE YOU" Noticing the humanity of people with advanced dementia by exploring the stories of meaningful connection between people with and without advanced dementia.

    Quinn John

    John Quinn

    Australia

    Masculinity and Social Mores: How can gender, and the era in which you are born, influence the impact of your diagnosis of dementia?

    Agnes Houston

    Agnes Houston MBE

    United Kingdom

    Agnes Houston MBE is a dementia activist who has always put others first.

    sean kelly

    Sean Kelly

    Australia

    Sean’s Story – Living with Frontotemporal Dementia

    Thersa Flavin

    Theresa Flavin

    Australia

    Dementia Centre Associate Consultant-Lived Experience, living with younger onset dementia